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How you can be part of the solution to our literacy crisis – Mail&Guardian

Why should YOU help to solve our literacy crisis?

You may think, ‘Why is this my problem? I pay my taxes and education is government’s responsibility. Isn’t this the work of NGO’s, philanthropists and CSI departments? How will I know my money will be well used?’ In this article, on Giving Tuesday, Wordworks Director Shelley O’Carroll responds to these questions and provides some practical ways for you to contribute. She challenges all South Africans to become part of the solution, and talks about why giving is important for those who give.

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Words that make sense – City Vision

“Friday was a day to remember for Grade R learners at Noluthando School for the Deaf in Khayelitsha, as they were taken through their graduation paces during a ceremony at the school. The eight learners, all seven-years-old, were joined by a group of parents who also graduated after completing an eight week course, designed to offer support to their deaf children, who are learners at the school.”

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Inkwenkwezi Society looks up – Grocotts Mail

The Inkwenkwezi Society aims to implement change through the use of preventative resources provided by national NGOs – such as Wordworks and Shine, to enhance the individual strengths of pupils as well as promote their mental well-being and resilience in schools around Grahamstown…at the end of a child’s programme, there is a notable difference in their self-esteem in that the students are more capable and confident in reading, writing and speaking in English. In addition, the programme has had a positive impact on each child’s sense of self-worth as they feel they have role to play in the classroom and want to be there.

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Pupils struggle to read in their mother tongue – Cape Argus

“O’Carroll said there was a need for investment in resources and books for children in African languages, so that children had opportunities brought to them in their own home language. She also said we had to resource teachers and help them to teach well in both languages. “There are many issues where teaching reading in African languages is concerned. Some are related to methodology and how reading is being taught, and some concern a lack of resources.”

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Project fosters good relations – City Press

‘Parent Thabisa Mathebula said the programmes not only helps her to effectively assist her child, but strengthened their relationship. “Through this course, I(have) learnt how much we as parents neglect our children. I have a new born baby and sometimes I would brush off my child because I am busy with the baby. This has helped me identify those things and be more involved in her school work,” she said. She said she has also learnt to take the child’s opinions into account and be more considerate.’

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